Why Turkey

The lean economic times the foodservice industry is currently facing requires a careful evaluation of daily operational practices. Restaurateurs need to look for ways to trim costs, reduce waste and maintain a steady customer base in this environment of sharply higher commodity costs, soaring fuel prices and continued food price inflation. Meanwhile, restaurant guests are squeezing their own food budgets and when they do dine out, they look for value on menus.

 

The Value of Turkey During Lean Times

The lean economic times the foodservice industry is currently facing requires a careful evaluation of daily operational practices. Restaurateurs need to look for ways to trim costs, reduce waste and maintain a steady customer base in this environment of sharply higher commodity costs, soaring fuel prices and continued food price inflation. Meanwhile, restaurant guests are squeezing their own food budgets and when they do dine out, they look for value on menus.

The National Turkey Federation (NTF) and National Restaurant Association (NRA) joined forces with other food industry groups in a plea to Congress to revisit the nation's food-to-fuel policies, a key factor in this struggling economy. Meanwhile, the turkey industry offers pointers to assist chefs and restaurateurs in this current perfect storm for foodservice operations.

Turkey has long been considered a staple for savvy foodservice managers. Chefs appreciate turkey'’s low food cost as much as its consumer appeal and versatility.

Chef Michael Foley of Chicago,
"Every single part of the bird, from the neck down can be used. This makes food costs drop because we prepare a variety of dishes including salad, saute of turkey breast and braised legs. Turkey has little waste because the carcass can produce a soup, chowder or rich stock."
 

Chef Joseph Worden of Wisconsin,
"Turkey is a great bargain, including the pre-portioned cuts such as tenderloins."

Chef Brandt Evans of Ohio,
"Featuring turkey allows us to stay at a lower plate cost, which saves both the restaurant and customer's money. Turkey allows me to have a balanced food cost ratio throughout my menu. It helps offset the higher ticket items."

Chef Susan Goss of Chicago,
"We can actually sell turkey for more money than chicken because it is a little different and usually the portion is bigger."