Cut the Calories. Eat Turkey.

October 24, 2012
WASHINGTON, D.C.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Sherrie Rosenblatt, National Turkey Federation
202-898-0100 ext. 227, srosenblatt@turkeyfed.org
or Maryanne Keeney, Devine & Pearson
617-472-2700 ext. 137 mkeeney@devine-pearson.com

For consumers bombarded with numerous nutritional messages, one message remains clear: Eating lean proteins like turkey can keep calories under control and help maintain a healthy body weight. To cut calories, replace protein meals with turkey, the perfect protein choice.

According to the National Turkey Federation, turkey is healthier than any other protein source. It has less fat, calories and sodium per serving than beef, veal, pork and lamb. A three-ounce serving of cooked skinless turkey has fewer calories from fat, zero saturated fat and 8 percent more protein than chicken.

“There are many fad diets and ‘slim down quick’ tips out there. But plain and simple, to drop the pounds, cut high-calorie proteins and replace them with turkey,” said Christine M. Palumbo, a Chicago-based registered nutritionist. “Turkey is essential for a healthy meal. It’s low in calories and full of nutrition. That’s a trend that will never fade away.”

Turkey is extremely versatile and can be prepared in many different ways. It’s healthier than high calorie proteins. For example, three-ounces of grilled citrus turkey tenderloin has 181 calories and makes a delicious dinner. Turkey wings tossed with buffalo or barbeque sauce is a low-fat appetizer and a wise and sensible breakfast choice is turkey sausages or bacon. Turkey’s healthy properties fit into any diet.

For more calorie or nutritional information comparing other proteins, visit the National Turkey Federation’s Web site, EatTurkey.com. This valuable resource has numerous pages such as cooking preparation tips to more than 1,500 recipes on the site.

Chart 1

Chart 2

Sources: Nutri-facts Update.
Chicken & turkey data source: USDA Handbook 8-5 and research conducted in cooperation with USDA
Beef & veal data source: USDA handbook 8-13, revised 1990 and Bulletin Board 1994 (beef) and USDA Handbook 8-17, 1989 (veal)
Pork & lamb data source: USDA Handbook 8-10, 1992 (pork) and USDA Handbook 8-17, 1989 and Bulletin Board, 1994 (lamb)


The National Turkey Federation (NTF) is the national advocate for all segments of the turkey industry, providing services and conducting activities that increase demand for its members' products by protecting and enhancing their ability to profitably provide wholesome, high-quality, nutritious products. Its award-winning web site, www.eatturkey.com, offers consumers, food professionals and the media an extensive library of information including healthy eating and restaurant trends, turkey cuts and purchasing tips, turkey nutrition and cooking techniques, and turkey facts and trivia.